The official making of Big Trouble in Little China, a book written by Tara Bennet & Paul Terry (2016)

Director John Carpenter will always be one of my favorite alltime horror movie directors. Best known for movies such as The Thing and Halloween he has made an impact on this genre that is felt even today. One of his lesser known, but no less fun movies is Big Trouble in Little China. While this one technically can not really be called a horror movie, it’s one of those films that has gathered a real cult status amongst fans, myself included. Two years ago, the movie celebrated it’s 30th anniversary, and as often happens during events like that some cool products were released to help celebrate it. One of the things I always enjoy reading is books that detail how a certain film was made, especially if they contain some cool facts and nice artwork. To my delight, finally John Carpenter’s classic got a book like that as well. And as Kurt Russel’s character Jack Burton from the movie would say: “Great, a six demon bag. What’s in it?”

image
“Son of a bitch must pay!!” 

Within the pages of this 176 page book you will find a lot of awesome never before seen photographs, that could definitely be called the highlight of this book. Included are promotional photographs, behind the scenes pictures, stills from the movie itself, and a lot of detailed artwork. All of these are printed in very high quality resolution, and every photograph no matter how small, get’s a description of what it shows. The latter might seem very obvious, but trust me when I say that there have also been making of books that did not include this information. That always annoys me to no end, because there have truly been some occasions where I would have loved to have found out what a certain picture depicted. The entire layout of the book, breathes the atmosphere of this great film, and the designers of this did a great job on that department. The book pretty much follows along with the story of the film, and so you will find yourself taking a trip down memory lane when you flip through the book.

image
The good old Pork-Chop Express.

But besides the photographs there is of course also a lot of information about what went on during the making of the movie itself. It is written in a clear and concise way, that includes insights from the cast and crew itself. Some of the text was a bit dry, especially when they went into details about which type of cameras were being used, and stuff like that. But that luckily doesn’t happen very often. There were two things I really enjoyed finding out about and had never known before, prior to reading this book. The first was that the actress that played the character of Margo Litzenberg, Kate Burton, was the daughter of the legendary actor Richard Burton. The other is the fact that this movie was really helpful in the promotion and use of Asian American actors. As we all know, there has been a lot of controversy over the “whitewashing” affairs of the American movie industry. This movie was way ahead of it’s time in the fact that it used almost primarily Asian American actors/actresses for it’s leading roles. A fact that the cast was very thankful of and that really becomes kind of a focal point throughout this book.

image
Some people just don’t look their best when they just woke up. 

The book is presented in pretty thick glossy pages that really give it the look of a high quality product. To round out the book we get a foreword written by the legendary director himself, and an afterword penned by it’s leading man Kurt Russell. This is a book that is written for the fans, there’s no question about that. If you have never seen the film, there is little to no point in picking this up. Unless you really like reading books about all the details and hard work that is put into making a film like this. However if you have been a fan of this cult classic as much as I have been, this one is well worth it to add to your collection. Overall it was a very enjoyable read, that contains a wealth of good background information, great interviews with cast and crew, and of course the visual aspects of it were a delight. You can almost hear the Pork-Chop Express driving up to your home with old Jack Burton on the CB saying: “It’s all in the reflexes”.

I give the Official Making of Big Trouble in Little China a 8 out of 10 score.

Advertisements

55 thoughts on “The official making of Big Trouble in Little China, a book written by Tara Bennet & Paul Terry (2016)”

    1. Haha, because it’s so weird, it’s such a fun watch 😊😊 But true,this film was received very poorly in the beginning, because people did not quite understand what this film set out to do. This book tells about that as well. But as is often the case, it’s a film that has now been appreciated by a lot of people and thus it has become a cult classic 😊 Glad to read you like the film as well 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That’s very true! The weirdness adds to it and makes it enjoyable. Pleased to see that it has achieved cult status and a following now though.😀

        I love the film, not old enough (quite) to have watched it when it was released though I was a kid at the time of the actual release but I remember seeing it a few years later. If it makes any sense for me it’s one of those 1980’s films that you can just watch, sit back and forget about the sh#t that’s going on now days and escape for a couple of hours.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Definitely the same with me: is was six years old when it was released, so I also saw it much later, but it’s one of those fun 80’s movies that I watch every few years or so. And it’s pretty much how the old saying goes: they dont’ make them like this anymore.
        Films like these just never get old, and will still be fun to watch in another 30 years or so 😀

        Liked by 1 person

  1. “The latter might seem very obvious, but trust me when I say that there have also been making of books that did not include this information. That always annoys me to no end, because there have truly been some occasions where I would have loved to have found out what a certain picture depicted.”
    – aw this is SO true! I hate when making ofs are full of intetesting stuff and you have no idea of what that actually is!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Same here 😀😀 There have been quite a few comics that continue the story but of course that is not the same as a movie.
      I have heard rumors about a remake with the Rock,but I already know that would probably be a horrible idea. Some movies just aren’t good for a remake: this is one of them 😊

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Haha:it is such a fun film: seriously one of those films that I watch every 2 or 3 years or so. Some lines I can recite from memory as well lol 😂😂 This is a great book to get especially if you like the film 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Yeah when it was released people did not quite know what to make of it. Quite a number of people took it way too seriously, and of course we know that this really isn’t a film that is really supposed to be taken serious.
      But I completely agree: I love this film as well. One of my alltime favorites that’s for sure 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much again 😀
      This movie is definitely one of those films that never gets old. Jack Burton’s oneliners are just so much fun! Great classic cultfilm. I was delighted they made a book out of it: but did you know there is also a seriously fun cardgame for it?😀😀 It was released in the same year 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Haha: thanks so much my friend 😊 I hope you will enjoy the movie. It really is a cult clasic, but just seriously fun, totally weird, but very interesting all at the same time. I hope you wil; enjoy it when you get around to seeing it. Looking forward to hearing your thoughts on it 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Could not agree with you more: this movie was way ahead of it’s time, even more than some people realise it. Truly a clasic and definitely on my alltime favorite list 😀
      This book definitely gives a great insight in the film itself. I had a lot of fun reading it 😀 Thanks for your comment 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Haha…that it does. But this is a film that really should not be taken very seriously. It really is pretty much a comedy, with great oneliners, and a truly fun script. This book was awesome in bringing back the vibe of the movie in a great way.
      Thank so much for your kind comment 😀

      Like

    1. This one has fallen a bit u der the radar, but people still keep discovering it, which is fun, especially since the movie is now over 30 years old. It really is just a film that was ahead of it’s time and a great fun watch. You can find it on dvd fairly easy. I hope you will enjoy it 😀

      Like

    1. Thanks so much for the kind words again 😘 Big trouble is pretty much the gift thst keeps on giving. I freaking love this film,,and this book really made me relive it in a great way: awesomeness 😍😍

      Like

  3. Ouuuh, this was soo interesting. A classic movie too! This might actually be the first time I read a review for one of those official behind the scenes books. I always thought of them as interesting books to pick up, but I’d have a hard time paying for them though. I actually prefer the video clips that sometimes come with the dvds/blurays for behind the scenes (or even just on Youtube). Glad to hear how much you enjoyed this though. Great review as always, sir! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much again 😊
      Well, there are a couple of making of books that are pricey, but there are also quite a few that are pretty much the same cost as a “normal” book. This one falls into that last category. I also love extras on dvd’s and pretty much always watch them. There are some documentaries that are quite boring (and consist of nothing more transacties praising the director they were working with and vice versa lol 😂😂). But there are also quite a few that are a wonderful and fun watch.
      I really liked this book, but then again I am also a huge fan of this movie 😀😀

      Liked by 1 person

  4. This is one of my husband’s all time favorite movies! I had never seen it until we met, and I swear he thought I had to have been raised in a box or something 😂😂 … He really couldn’t grasp the fact that a person existed who’s never seen Big Trouble in Little China!! Great post 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Haha 😂😂 That is such a great story. Well, I can understand you not having seen it. It certainly isn’t one of his better known films, and has just grown into a cult classic, that admittedly was light years ahead of it’s time when it came out. But it really is stil, after all these years, a really fun movie.
      Thanks so much for yiur kind words, glad you liked the post😀

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Well: you can find. Copy of this quite easily over on Amazon (I just checked to make sure lol 😂😂). But this book is certainly a lot of fun. As to why they waited for publishing this 30 years I really haven’t got a clue. But I guess better late than never as they say.
      That’s the final post I read before heading off to work. When I wanted to comment on it later that day your blog was taken down. So I am going to head on over there now to leave the comment I had wanted to leave there 😀😀

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Groovy!
        Yes, there’s always th online option – can’t find Kurt Russell cult classics in th stores, but then th stores are closing cos they can’t compete w th online options -crazy!

        Like

    1. So true. This was such a terrific blend of genres. East meets west so to speak. It was a film that was seriously ahead of it’s time, but really misunderstood in the era where it was released. Still a terrific and very fun watch 😀

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s